Colorado Life Zones: Seasons, Plants, & Animals
Step 1: Choose One of the Life Zones or Choices Below
CO Life Zone Menu Bar
Colorado Life Zones General information Interactive Life Zone Diagram Colorado Life Zones Maps Semidesert Shrublands Life Zone West CO Shortgrass Prairie or Plains Life Zones Foothills Woodlands and Shrublands Montane Forests Life Zone Subalpine Life Zone Alpine Life Zone Riparian Life Zones
Semidesert Shrublands Life Zone: Seasons, Plants, & Animals
Step 2: Choose a Topic from the Semidesert Shrublands Life Zone & Scroll Down

Semidesert Shrublands Life Zone General Information

General Information

Semidesert Shrublands Through the Seasons

Through the Seasons

Semidesert Canyonlands and Shrublands

Canyonlands and Shrublands

Semidesert Shrublands Awesome Adaptations Awesome Adaptations

Semidesert Shrublands Plants and Trees

Plants and Trees

Semidesert Shrublands Mammals

Mammals

Semidesert Shrublands Birds

Birds

Semidesert Shrublands Reptiles and Amphibians

Reptiles & Amphibians

Mammals of the Semidesert Shrublands Life Zone 
    In order to survive the hot dry summers, animals have adapted by only coming out in the early morning, late afternoon, or night to find food and hunt.  During the hottest part of the day, most animals need to rest and to hide under rocks or underground burrows OR in the shade of the desert canyons. Some animals, like the coyote and ringtail cat, are nocturnal (move around and hunt mostly at night). Animals need to get much of their water from the food they eat.

Mountain Lion or Cougar

CO Div of Wildlife

Bear Country USA

Animal Files

Southwest_Wildlife

Mountain Lion or Cougar

Bobcat

Nature Works

CO Div of Wildlife

Hogle Zoo

Animal Files

Bobcat

Coyote

Nature Works

CO Div of Wildlife

Animal Files

Bear Country USA

Southwest Wildlife

Coyote

Kit Fox

CO Div of Wildlife

Utah Div of Wildlife

Animal Files

Southwest_Wildlife

Kit Fox

Ringtail Cat

CO Div of Wildlife

Animal Files

Oregon Zoo

Southwest Wildlife

Ringtail Cat

Gray Fox

Nature Works

CO Div of Wildlife

Animal Files

Southwest Wildlife

Gray Fox

American Badger

Nature Works


CO Div of Wildlife

Bear Country USA

Animal Files

American Badger

Black-footed Ferret

Nature Works

CO Div of Wildlife

Def. or Wildlife

Animal Files

Black-footed Ferret

Western Spotted Skunk

CO Div of Wildlife

Hogle Zoo

Blue Planet Biome

Animal Files

Western Spotted Skunk

White-tailed Prairie Dog

US Fish & Wildlife

Gunnison's Prairie Dog

CO Div of Wildlife

CSU NDIS

White-tailed Prairie Dog

Desert Cottontail Rabbit

Nature Works

CO Div of Wildlife

Hogle Zoo

Animal Files

Desert Cottontail Rabbit

Black-tailed Jackrabbit

Nature Works

White-tailed Jackrabbit

CO Div of Wildlife

CSU NDIS

Black-tailed Jackrabbit

White-tailed Antelope Squirrel

Wyoming Ground Squirrel

CO Div of Wildlife
White-tailed Antelope Squirrel

Mexican Woodrat or Packrat

CO Div of Wildlife

Utah Div of Wildlife

CSU NDIS

Mexican Woodrat or Packrat

Ord's Kangaroo Rat

CO Div of Wildlife

Utah Div of Wildlife

Blue Planet Biome

Ord's Kangaroo Rat

Harvest Mice

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Northern Grasshopper Mice

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White-footed Mice

CSU NDIS

Northern Grasshopper Mouse

Hopi Chipmunk

CO Div of Wildlife

Utah Div of Wildlife

CSU NDIS

Hopi Chipmunk

Desert Shrew

CO Div of Wildlife

Utah Div of Wildlife

CSU NDIS

Desert Shrew

Pocket Gophers

CO Div of Wildlife

CSU NDIS

Utah Div of Wildlife

Pocket Gopher

Brazillian Free-tailed Bat

Utah Div of Wildlife

& Other Bats

CO Div of Wildlife

CSU NDIS

Brazillian Free-tailed Bat

Desert Bighorn Sheep

Utah Div of Wildlife

Hogle Zoo

NPS: Canyonlands

Desert Bighorn Sheep

Pronghorn

Nature Works

CO Div of Wildlife

San Diego Zoo

Pronghorn

Mule Deer

CO Div of Wildlife

Utah Div of Wildlife

Animal Files

Mule Deer

 

 
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Awesome Adaptations: Ringtail Cat

    One of the least known animals that lives in the southern and western Colorado is the ringtail cat. A ringtail cat is really not part of the cat family. Its closest relative in North America is the raccoon. It got its name because it is about the size of a small house cat and has a long black and white ringed bushy tail. The ringtail cat is an amazing climber. It can easily climb up steep cliffs and trees. The ringtail can can turn its back feet around 180 degrees and use its tail for balance while climbing. It mainly eats small creatures like insects, mice, packrats, rabbits, birds, lizards, and frogs. However, it can also eat fruit. If it feels in danger the ringtail can make a stinky odor to scare away predators. Ringtail cats are nocturnal, meaning they only come out at night. The ringtail's eyes are very sensitive to light and it can see very well at night. When people see this secretive nocturnal animal for the very first time, they ask themselves, "is it some wierd house cat? Is it a raccoon?" No it's the ringtail cat.

Sources of information and to find more information: CO Div of Wildlife, Southwest Wildlife, Oregon Zoo Animal Files

Ringtail Cat Ringtail Cat